Language

Unconscious Acts

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It’s all well and good teaching language in conversation, but have you ever noticed you open your mouth when you are about to ask a question, or raise your eyebrows when surprised or expecting a question, or even rapidly inhale when you are ready to speak? It all adds to the flavour of practicing conversation and students’ non verbal actions.

Building Language

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As much as a teacher tries to build language, it helps to highlight certain grammar points that help to expand the students’ sentences by questioning them about factors such as time, place and manner. We can add details to the students’ speech or writing with adverbial phrases.
Example #1

Time (answers the question ‘When?’)

She will be arriving in a short time.

Place (answers the question ‘Where?’)

He is waiting near the wall.

Manner (answers the question ‘How?’)

They are discussing the matter in a civilized way.

Example #2

“Sue went” doesn’t convey much information.

S: Sue went.

T: Where did Sue go?

S: Sue went to the gym.

T: And, when did Sue go to the gym?

S: Sue went to the gym after work.

T: And also, why did Sue go to the gym after work?

S: Sue went to the gym after work to keep her New Year’s resolution.

“Sue went to the gym after work to keep her New Year’s resolution” explains the where, when and why of the event.

Moreover, adverbial phrases can be created by using prepositions to tell how, where, when, and how often. For example, “Sue swam with perfect technique in the pool before lunch on Tuesday.”